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CT Fence from Home Improvement contractors offers you fences, wood fences, vinyl fences and chain link fence. Our construction remodeling projects that include fences and the installation of fences in Ct.

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A fence is a freestanding structure designed to restrict or prevent movement across a boundary. It is generally distinguished from a wall by the lightness of its construction: a wall is usually restricted to such barriers made from solid brick or concrete, blocking vision as well as passage (though the definitions overlap somewhat).

Fences are constructed for several purposes, including:

Agricultural fencing, to keep livestock in or predators out
Privacy fencing, to provide privacy
Temporary fencing, to provide safety and security, and to direct movement, wherever temporary access control is required, especially on building and construction sites
Perimeter fencing, to prevent trespassing or theft and/or to keep children and pets from wandering away.
Decorative fencing, to enhance the appearance of a property, garden or other landscaping
Boundary fencing, to demarcate a piece of real property
Contents
1 Types
2 Requirement of use
3 Legal issues
3.1 History

3.3 United States
4 Quotations
5 See also
6 References
Contents
1 Sizes and uses
2 Installation
3 Development of chain link fencing
4 Chain-link fence recommendations
5 See also
6 Notable uses
7 External links
Types

Typical agricultural barbed wire fencing.
Split-rail fencing common in timber-rich areas.
Chain link fence surrounding a field in Jurong, Singapore.Various types of fencing include:
A balustrade or railing is a kind of fence to prevent people from falling over the edge, for example, on a balcony, stairway (see railing system), roof, bridge, or elsewhere near a body of water, places where people stand or walk and the terrain goes steeply down, and so on.
Requirement of use

Typical perimeter fence with barbed wire on top.The following types of areas or facilities often have to be fenced in:

facilities with open high-voltage equipment (transformer stations, mast radiators). Transformer stations are usually surrounded with barbed-wire fences. Around mast radiators, wooden fences are used to avoid the problem of eddy currents.
railway lines (in the United Kingdom)
fixed machinery with dangerous mobile parts (for example at merry go rounds on entertainment parks)
explosive factories and quarry stores
most industrial plants
airfields
military areas
prisons
zoos and wildlife parks
Pastures containing male breeding animals, notably bulls and stallions.
open-air areas that charge an entry fee
domestic swimming and spa pools
Legal issues

A typical urban fence.
Decorative palace fence (in St Petersburg)Fences can be the source of bitter arguments between neighbours, and there are often special laws to deal with these problems. Common disagreements include what kind of fence is required, what kind of repairs are needed, and how to share the costs.

In some legislatures the standard height of a fence is limited, and to exceed it a special permit is required.

History
Servitudes are legal arrangements of land use arising out of private agreements. Under the feudal system, most land in England was cultivated in common fields, where peasants were allocated strips of arable land that were used to support the needs of the local village or manor. By the sixteenth century the growth of population and prosperity provided incentives for landowners to use their land in more profitable ways, dispossessing the peasantry. Common fields were aggregated and enclosed by large and enterprising farmers�either through negotiation among one another or by lease from the landlord�to maximize the productivity of the available land and contain livestock. Fences redefined the means by which land is used, resulting in the modern law of servitudes.[1]


A wattle fence at Sanok-Skansen outdoor museum in PolandIn the United States, the earliest settlers claimed land by simply fencing it in. Later, as the American government formed, unsettled land became technically owned by the government and programs to register land ownership developed, usually making raw land available for low prices or for free, if the owner improved the property, including the construction of fences. However, the remaining vast tracts of unsettled land were often used as a commons, or, in the American west, "open range." As degradation of habitat developed due to overgrazing and a tragedy of the commons situation arose, common areas began to either be allocated to individual landowners via mechanisms such as the Homestead Act and Desert Land Act and fenced in, or, if kept in public hands, leased to individual users for limited purposes, with fences built to separate tracts of public and private land.
United Kingdom
Ownership of the fence varies. In some parts of the country all boundaries are shared; in other parts of the country you may own the boundary on the left-hand or right-hand side, however, only the title deeds can be depended on to tell you which side is yours. (A 'T' symbol indicates who is the owner). It used to be normal for the cladding to be on the non-owners side (enabling access to the posts for the owner when repairs need doing), but increasingly this cannot be depended on.

Where a fence or hedge has an adjacent ditch, the ditch is normally in the same ownership as the hedge or fence, with the ownership boundary being the edge of the ditch furthest from the fence or hedge[2]. The principle of the rule is that an owner digging a boundary ditch will normally dig it up to the very edge of their land, and must then pile the spoil on their own side of the ditch to avoid trespassing on their neighbour. They may then erect a fence or hedge on the spoil, leaving the ditch on its far side. Exceptions often occur, for example where a plot of land derives from subdivision of a larger one along the centre line of a previously existing ditch or other feature.

On private land in the United Kingdom, it is the landowner's responsibility to fence their livestock in. Conversely, for common land, it is the surrounding landowners' responsibility to fence the common's livestock out.

Five foot high fences (over which many people can see and talk) are increasingly being superseded by six-foot fences giving the impression of complete privacy.

United States
Distinctly different land ownership and fencing patterns arose in the eastern and western United States. Original fence laws on the east coast were based on the British common law system, and rapidly increasing population quickly resulted in laws requiring livestock to be fenced in. In the west, land ownership patterns and policies reflected a strong influence of Spanish law and tradition, plus the vast land area involved made extensive fencing impractical until mandated by a growing population and conflicts between landowners. The "open range" tradition of requiring landowners to fence out unwanted livestock was dominant in most of the rural west until very late in the 20th century, and even today, a few isolated regions of the west still have open range statutes on the books. Today, across the nation, each state is free to develop its own laws regarding fences, but in most cases for both rural and urban property owners, the laws are designed to require adjacent landowners to share the responsibility for maintaining a common boundary fenceline, and the fence is generally constructed on the surveyed property line as precisely as possible.
Quotations

Wrought iron fencing is often used in historic districts and to surround cemeteries."Good fences make good neighbors." - Robert Frost (ironically, in the poem "Mending Wall").

"A good neighbour is a fellow who smiles at you over the back fence, but doesn't climb over it." - Arthur Baer

"There is something about jumping a horse over a fence, something that makes you feel good. Perhaps it's the risk, the gamble. In any event it's a thing I need." - William Faulkner

"Fear is the highest fence." - Dudley Nichols

"To be fenced in is to be withheld- Kurt Tippett

"What have they done to the earth?/ What have they done to our fair sister?/ Ravaged and plundered/ and ripped her/ and bit her/ stuck her with knives/ in the side of the dawn/ and tied her with fences/ and dragged her down." - Jim Morrison, of The Doors

"Don't Fence Me In (song)" - Cole Porter
A chain-link fence (also referred to as wire netting, chain-wire fence, cyclone fence or hurricane fence) is a type of woven fence usually made from galvanized or LLDPE-coated steel wire. The wires run vertically and are bent into a zig-zag pattern so that each "zig" hooks with the wire immediately on one side and each "zag" with the wire immediately on the other. This forms the characteristic diamond pattern seen in this type of fence.

Contents
1 Sizes and uses
2 Installation
3 Development of chain link fencing
4 Chain-link fence recommendations
5 See also
6 Notable uses
7 External links

Fences are constructed for several purposes, including:

Agricultural fencing, to keep livestock in or predators out
Privacy fencing, to provide privacy
Temporary fencing, to provide safety and security, and to direct movement, wherever temporary access control is required, especially on building and construction sites
Perimeter fencing, to prevent trespassing or theft and/or to keep children and pets from wandering away.
Decorative fencing, to enhance the appearance of a property, garden or other landscaping
Boundary fencing, to demarcate a piece of real property
Contents
1 Types
2 Requirement of use
3 Legal issues
3.1 History
3.2 United Kingdom
3.3 United States
4 Quotations
5 See also
6 References

Types

Typical agricultural barbed wire fencing.
Split-rail fencing common in timber-rich areas.
Chain link fence surrounding a field in Jurong, Singapore.Various types of fencing include:
A balustrade or railing is a kind of fence to prevent people from falling over the edge, for example, on a balcony, stairway (see railing system), roof, bridge, or elsewhere near a body of water, places where people stand or walk and the terrain goes steeply down, and so on.
Requirement of use

Typical perimeter fence with barbed wire on top.The following types of areas or facilities often have to be fenced in:

facilities with open high-voltage equipment (transformer stations, mast radiators). Transformer stations are usually surrounded with barbed-wire fences. Around mast radiators, wooden fences are used to avoid the problem of eddy currents.
railway lines (in the United Kingdom)
fixed machinery with dangerous mobile parts (for example at merry go rounds on entertainment parks)
explosive factories and quarry stores
most industrial plants
airfields
military areas
prisons
zoos and wildlife parks
Pastures containing male breeding animals, notably bulls and stallions.
open-air areas that charge an entry fee
domestic swimming and spa pools
Legal issues

A typical urban fence.
Decorative palace fence (in St Petersburg)Fences can be the source of bitter arguments between neighbours, and there are often special laws to deal with these problems. Common disagreements include what kind of fence is required, what kind of repairs are needed, and how to share the costs.

In some legislatures the standard height of a fence is limited, and to exceed it a special permit is required.

History
Servitudes are legal arrangements of land use arising out of private agreements. Under the feudal system, most land in England was cultivated in common fields, where peasants were allocated strips of arable land that were used to support the needs of the local village or manor. By the sixteenth century the growth of population and prosperity provided incentives for landowners to use their land in more profitable ways, dispossessing the peasantry. Common fields were aggregated and enclosed by large and enterprising farmers�either through negotiation among one another or by lease from the landlord�to maximize the productivity of the available land and contain livestock. Fences redefined the means by which land is used, resulting in the modern law of servitudes.[1]


Sizes and uses

Chain link fence shown protecting an animal enclosure.In the United States, fencing usually comes in 20 rod and 50 ft rolls which can be joined by "unscrewing" one of the end wires and then "screwing" it back in so that it hooks both pieces. Common heights include 3 ft, 3 ft 6 in, 4 ft, 5 ft, 6 ft, 7 ft, 8 ft, 10 ft, and 12 ft, though almost any height is possible. Common mesh gauges are 9, 11, and 11.5. For tennis courts and ball parks the most popular height is 10 ft.

The popularity of chain-link fence is due to its relatively low cost and ease of installation. A further advantage is that due to the open weave, chain-link fences are transparent, and do not obscure sunlight from either side of the fence. If a semi-opaque fence is desired, this can be achieved by the insertion of slats into the mesh.

Installation
The installation of chain-link fence involves setting posts into the ground and attaching the fence to them. The posts may comprise steel tubing, timber or concrete and may be driven into the ground or set in concrete. End, Corner or Gate posts, commonly referred to as Terminal Posts, must either be set in concrete footing or otherwise anchored to prevent leaning under the tension of a stretched fence. Posts set between the Terminal Posts are called Line Posts and are set in concrete footings (or in some geographical locations driven in place) at equal intervals not to exceed 10' on center. The fence is then attached at one end, stretched, and attached at the other; the excess being easily removed by "unscrewing" a wire. Finally it is tied to the line posts with aluminum wire. In many cases a bottom tension wire, sometimes referred to as coil wire, may be stretched from Terminal Post to Terminal Post in order to help minimize the in and out movement that occurs at the bottom of the chain link mesh between posts. Once stretched, this wire should be secured to the line posts and the chain link mesh "hog ringed" to the tension wire 2' on center. The installation of this wire is generally done prior to the installation of the chain link mesh.

Development of chain link fencing
In the United Kingdom the firm of Barnard, Bishop & Barnard was established in Norwich to produce chain-link fencing by machine. The process was developed by Charles Barnard in 1844 based on cloth weaving machines (Up until that time Norwich had a long history of cloth manufacture). [1]

Anchor Fence (established in 1891) was the first US company to manufacture chain-link fencing by machines using equipment imported from Belgium.
Vinyl fence is a recent and modern style of fence, used for both agricultural fencing and for residential use. Vinyl fence is generally available preformed in a wide variety of styles. It tends to be easy to clean, resists weathering and has low maintenance requirements. However, it also can be more expensive than comparable materials, and cheaper products can be less sturdy than more traditional fence materials. Some types may become brittle, faded or degrade in quality after long exposure to extreme hot or cold conditions.

Vinyl used for residential uses can be a solid cast form, or a reinforced hollow rail design that resembles wood. For agricultural use, vinyl fencing can consist of a vinyl strapping product inlaid with cable, vinyl-coated wire, or a vinyl coating over a wood or metal rail or plank. Hollow residential vinyl fencing products are usually too fragile to contain livestock, but some designs may be suitable for containing dogs or other pets.

Different from wood and chain link, vinyl profiles can be cut and shaped to just about any desired size. Vinyl fences come in many different colors which are digitally integrated into the vinyl extrusion process which means they will not have to be painted every few years. Usually this ability to resist discoloration leads many manufacturers to offer a warranty of up to thirty years.

Vinyl fence posts are placed into pre-dug holes, and sometimes the vinyl post is fitted over a pre-set post of wood or pipe for additional sturdiness. Rails or pickets are inserted into specifically designed slots and grooves within the rails.
A split-rail fence and log fence is a type of fence constructed out of timber logs, usually split lengthwise into "rails" and typically used for agricultural or decorative fencing. Such fences require much more timber than other types of fences, and so are not common in areas where wood is scarce or expensive. However, they are very simple in their construction, and can be assembled with few tools even on hard or rocky ground. They also can be built without using any nails or other hardware; such hardware was often scarce in frontier locations. They can even be partially or wholly disassembled if the fence needs to be moved or the wood becomes more useful for other purposes. During the Civil War, these split rail fences were a major source of firewood for both the Union and Confederate armies.


Log fence with double posts (photo taken in 1938).Split rail fences were made of easy to split, rot resistant wood. Traditionally American chestnut was the tree of choice until wire fencing became cheaper and the chestnut blight eliminated this tree. Currently, most split rails are made from cedar logs. Whether of chestnut or cedar, these logs were cut to a length of 10 to 12 feet (3.7 m) and split down the length of the log. Each half was then split into quarters, then eighths and so on until the rails were of a usable size. Depending on the diameter of the log, you could get 4 rails from an 8-inch (200 mm) log to over a dozen from larger logs. The pieces, called "rails," were stacked on top of one another. Most split rail fences had the rails stacked in an interlocking zig-zag fashion that is self-supporting, easy to create, easy to repair, and easy to disassemble.


A split-rail fence with supports.Some timber fences had the rails stacked directly on top of each other and secured them with double fence posts (one on either side of the rails). This made a more permanent and compact fence but remained easy to repair.

The length of a zig zag fence was such that the distance between either the zigs or the zags was 16� feet or one rod. A landowner could then count the zigs or the zags along the side and end of his field and determine the number of square rods in a field which in turn told him how many acres the field contained. One hundred sixty square rods is 1-acre (4,000 m2), so a field ten rods times sixteen rods was an acre.


A split-rail fence in suburban America with wire fence cover, built 1999.A variation on
Aluminum
Barbed wire fence
Cactus fence
Chain link fencing, sometimes called "wire netting"
Concrete fence, easy to install and highly durable
Chicken wire, light wire mesh for keeping predators out and chickens or other small livestock in
Dry-stone wall or rock fence, often agricultural
Electric fence
Ha-ha (or sunken fence)
Hedgerows of intertwined, living shrubs (constructed by hedge laying)
High tensile smooth wire
Hurdle fencing, made from moveable sections
Live fencing is the use of live woody species for fences.
Palisade
Pest-exclusion fence
Pet fence Underground Fence for pet containment
Picket fences, generally a waist-high, painted, partially decorative fence
Privacy Fence Commonly Cedar pickets; usually six-feet tall
Pool fence
Post-and-rail fencing
Roundpole fences, similar to post and rail fencing but more closely spaced rails, typical of Scandinavia and other areas rich in raw timber.

Slate fencing in Mid-WalesSlate fence, a type of palisade made of vertical slabs of slate wired together. Commonly used in parts of Wales.
Snow fence
Spear-top fence
Split-rail fences made of timber, often laid in a zig-zag pattern, particularly in newly-settled parts of the United States and Canada
Stake-and-wire fencing
Turf mounds in semiarid grasslands such as the western United States or Russian steppes`
Temporary fencing
Vinyl fencing
Wattle fencing, of split branches woven between stakes, or of moveable wattle hurdles.
Wood-panel fencing
Woven wire fencing, many designs, from fine Chicken wire to heavy mesh "sheep fence" or "ring fence"
Wrought iron fencing, made from tube steel, also known as ornamental iron.
Alternatives to fencing are a hedge or a ditch (sometimes filled with water, forming a moat).

the traditional split-rail fence has become common in suburban America in the late 20th century. This variation is not free-standing but consists of vertical posts with holes into which the ends of rough hewn horizontal pieces are placed. A common addition to this, particular where pets or children are involved, is a wire fence affixed to the inner or outer face of the split-rail fence.
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